Neighborhood Spotlight: Green Hills

One of Nashville’s most affluent communities can be found just a few miles south of downtown. Nestled between the 12 South and Belle Meade neighborhoods, Green Hills is a bustling community that welcomes both natives and newcomers to share in its many shopping, dining and recreational opportunities.

Green Hills began as a small community in the 1930s. After World War II, it grew significantly as people began building houses in anticipation of new business activity throughout the area.

The neighborhood is most widely known for its upscale shopping, such as the Hill Center – an open-air shopping concept – and the Mall at Green Hills, which opened in 1955 as a strip mall. Since then, the mall has undergone major expansions and renovations so that it now holds more than 100 stores and restaurants combined. Green Hills is also home to an iconic music venue, the Bluebird Cafe, which opened in 1982 and welcomes more than 70,000 visitors each year.

The community is located just a short distance from Nashville’s three major universities – Belmont, Lipscomb and Vanderbilt. College students and families alike can be seen at the local movie theater and nearby restaurants.

Radnor Lake State Park rests on the outskirts of Green Hills and boasts abundant wildlife, scenic hiking trails and numerous photo opportunities.

Real estate in the area is booming as more people and businesses look for places to reside within Davidson County. Southeast Venture’s architecture team is currently designing a new multi-family development in the heart of the shopping district with plans for a LEED-certified “green” roof.

At the Hill Center, Southeast Venture helped Endodontic Associates find its new home and provided interior design services to arrange the space according to its needs. A local foster care organization, Monroe Harding, also recently enlisted Southeast Venture to sell its property and use the proceeds to expand its youth services.

Green Hills is a popular neighborhood that will experience sustainable growth as new developments and renovations take place. And areas like this are sure to increase in value as demand for space in and around Nashville continues to rise.

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Neighborhood Spotlight: East Nashville

Nashville is home to many different neighborhoods, each with its own sense of style and personality. One of the city’s many fast-growing districts is East Nashville—a diverse corner of Music City that, over the past five years, has changed tremendously and continues to develop, welcoming new urban restaurants, eclectic shopping and a blossoming real estate market.

From the dainty Shoppes on Fatherland to the Beer Works scene on Trinity Lane, East Nashville has something for everyone. Its creative vibe sets the area apart from the rest of the city, and its charm has caught the attention of tastemakers around the country, including Vogue Magazine, which calls East Nashville our city’s “coolest neighborhood.”

Development is flourishing, and one of the newest buildings to pop up in the district is Southeast Venture’s Eastside Heights. With nearly 250 units, this apartment complex offers a sky lounge with a view of the city, a 24-hour fitness center, an outdoor movie theater, retail space and more. Just across the bridge from downtown, Eastside Heights is only a five-minute bike ride to some of the city’s most popular attractions.

Most notably, a massive yellow and black mural of the word “EAST” covers over 4,500 square feet of the property’s western-facing exterior wall. Thanks to its prime location next to I-24, the mural welcomes about 100,000 vehicles each day.

East Nashville

Image: Aerial Innovations

Southeast Venture again enlisted the help of the Nashville Walls Project to commission the artwork. Founded by Brian Grief and Eva Boros in 2014, the Nashville Walls Project sought to expand street art beyond major cities, such as San Francisco, Los Angeles and Miami, and introduce building murals to Nashville.

“Nashville is a great arts city,” said Brian Greif. “It’s known mostly for music, but there’s also a strong graffiti scene. The Nashville Walls Project has helped add to the visual dialogue of the city and opened up new opportunities for both local and international artists.”

East Nashville

Image: Aerial Innovations

Southeast Venture collaborated with local artists and design firm Sideshow to develop the concept, which was painted by Jon Buko and Meghan Wood of Nashville’s “I Saw the Sign” artists group.

“The Eastside Heights mural really captures the essence of East Nashville,” Grief added. “We’re thrilled with how it turned out and know that it will stand as a gateway to the community for years to come.”

Neighborhood Spotlight: 12 South

From its vintage charm to its modern-chic vibes, 12 South is a popular dining, shopping and people-watching hub for Nashville natives and visitors alike.

Before it was carved out as a separate neighborhood in the 1990s, 12 South was considered part of the Belmont – Hillsboro neighborhood, which was previously known as Waverly Belmont – a community that developed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries in response to the advent of the streetcar, which allowed Nashville to expand into the surrounding farmland. The large farms that once occupied the Granny White Pike area have since been replaced with commercial retail and residential buildings. Evidence of Waverly Belmont’s rich history can still be seen in its traditional churches and foursquare homes.

In the 1990s, an alliance of Hawkins Partners, 1221, MDHA and others, including real estate brokers Joel Solomon and Mark Deutschmann, created and implemented a plan to designate 12 South as a separate neighborhood. The vision of these urban pioneers led to 12 South becoming the thriving community it is today. Now, boutiques and quaint restaurants line the streets, drawing in the business of tourists and locals alike.

12 South Flats

12 South Flats

The 12 South Farmers’ Market is held on Tuesdays in Sevier Park – at the south end of the district – and food trucks, vendors and music acts line the park as visitors enjoy the sights and sounds of the event.

Sevier Park is also home to the historic Sunnyside mansion, a home built in 1852. The home was most notably owned by Mary Benton, whose husband Jesse is known for holding a pistol fight with President Andrew Jackson. During the Civil War, Sunnyside sat between the Union and Confederate sides. Over 150 years since its foundation was laid, the yellow house still stands atop a hill inside the park for visitors to see.

12 South Flats

12 South Flats

Real estate here is highly sought after, and Southeast Venture’s 12 South Flats is a prime example of the charming residential spaces available in the area. The modern property is a mixed-use building featuring nearly 10,000 square feet of ground-floor retail space and 90 residential units. The property offers a variety of floor plans with a luxurious loft experience, and the location can’t be beat.

The rising popularity of the 12 South district has made the secret of its charm impossible to keep, but the charismatic neighborhood will forever remain one of Nashville’s greatest treasures.

Neighborhood Spotlight: The Nations

An area’s history often defines its future, and this certainly rings true for one West Nashville neighborhood, The Nations. Once a meeting place for Native American tribal nations – hence its name – The Nations community became known over the years as home to Nashvillians who worked in the automobile, lumber and agricultural industries.

In recent years, commercial and residential real estate opportunities in the area have grown tremendously. Thanks to the boom in popularity, residents and business owners continue to flock to the West Nashville neighborhood, building thousands of new homes and starting a number of new businesses, and transforming the quiet, hard-working neighborhood into a local hotspot for both natives and tourists.

Arguably the most notable landmark of The Nations is an icon of the community’s industrial past. A 200-foot tall abandoned grain silo sits in the eastern portion of a 37.7-acre site, being developed by Southeast Venture. The project is named Silo Bend in honor of the silo and the property’s location across from a bend of the Cumberland River.

The silo is a symbol of the community—a monument of the past—and can be seen from miles away. That’s why Southeast Venture, in conjunction with Brian Greif and the Nashville Walls Project, arranged for a massive mural to adorn its side.

The Nations

Photo credit: Brian Siskind, Those Drones

Together, they enlisted Australian artist Guido van Helten, who is known for his larger-than-life portrait paintings around the world.

Van Helten came to Nashville in May and spent a week in The Nations community—meeting with residents, learning about the culture and developing his concept for the mural. It was then he met Lee D. Estes, an elderly resident of The Nations, who was volunteering at the Saint Luke’s Community Center. The 91-year-old resident has called The Nations “home” for his entire life and struck Van Helten as a the perfect subject to capture the essence of the community.

The Nations

Photo credit: Brian Siskind, Those Drones

The Nations

Photo credit: Brian Siskind, Those Drones

Guido completed the work over two weeks in May 2017. The enormous silo mural can now be seen from miles away and has already become a well-known landmark of the up-and-coming development and surrounding community.

Southeast Venture has bigger plans for Silo Bend than the massive mural. A 193-unit apartment complex is currently under construction, and mixed-use commercial space and single-family homes will also fill the property, inviting more newcomers to The Nations. This development will undoubtedly spring even more life into the growing Nations district as it becomes the latest in Nashville’s run of trending hot-spots.

Creating a High-Energy Space for a Health Services Company in West Nashville

When companies outgrow their existing spaces, they often look for a different design concept for their new location. But sometimes a company really likes its existing layout and wants more of the same on a larger scale.

This was the case with MediCopy, a health information exchange company located in West Nashville, which had outgrown its space. When we met to discuss their design needs and wishes for their new office, we learned that they were looking for a bright, open, energetic workspace to reflect their fun, upbeat company culture. This included designing open areas for people to gather, incorporating the company’s logo colors in the design and maintaining a sleek, modern look throughout.

The workspaces are primarily made up of open desk areas, which allow the rooms to maintain a spacious, bright feeling. For those who do have offices, glass walls provide separation from the outside but allow them to maintain a visual connection to the rest of the room. Tall, exposed ceilings give it a contemporary, industrial look, while wood elements combined with bright colors make this office truly one of a kind.

To see how the design turned out, take a look at these photos:

The lobby and front desk at MediCopy.

The bistro offers different seating choices and plenty of sunlight.

A spacious conference room that features the company’s logo colors.

One of the primary workspaces that features several open desks and wall-to-wall windows.

With a space like this, we know the folks at MediCopy will feel energized and excited to work in their new location. And with plenty of room to grow, we’re sure they’ll be enjoying this space for years to come.

Neighborhood Spotlight: Germantown

To visitors, Nashville is the destination to hear up-and-coming country music artists and try some of our city’s world-famous hot chicken. However, to residents, both native and new, Nashville is more than just lower Broadway. It’s made up of many small neighborhoods, each adding their own style and culture to the overall charm of Music City.

In this post, we’re shining the spotlight on one of our town’s hottest neighborhoods: Germantown.

Vista Germantown

Vista Germantown

This quaint neighborhood, which earned its name from the many German immigrants who flocked to Nashville in the early 1800s, is an 18-square block area just north of downtown. For such a compact area, it is surprisingly diverse, with single-family homes, restaurants, shops, businesses and mixed-use properties. The area has come a long way from its humble beginning and looks very different from how it did just a few years ago.

The land where Germantown sits was gifted to James McGavock for his service in the Revolutionary War. It was used mostly for farming until the early 1800s when McGavock started selling pieces of his land to incoming German families, whose cultural backgrounds and skills shaped many of the architectural influences we still see today. In 1865, Germantown was incorporated into the Nashville city limits as part of the Ninth Ward. This marked the beginning of Germantown’s largest growth period, during which prominent businesses, such as Neuhoff Slaughterhouse and Werthan Bag Co., set up shop in the area.

The Germantown area began to decline in the 1950s. World War II had caused many families to leave the area for other parts of the city, and the suburbs gained popularity for residential living. This left many residential buildings empty, which were demolished due to lack of upkeep or to make way for other structures, most of which were industrial.

In 1979, Germantown was listed on The National Register for Historic Places, breathing new life back into the neighborhood. Many lots were rezoned from industrial back to residential use. And in 2002, the Metropolitan Planning Department created a detailed neighborhood design plan as a tool to provide a greater level of guidance for future planning and growth. Today, Germantown is an eclectic mix of old and new buildings, with new construction carrying on many of the historic architectural features of generations before. Bristol Development recognized Germantown’s appeal to residents, and in 2012, the company developed Vista Germantown. Designed by Southeast Venture, this 260-unit multi-family/mixed-use development combines modern elements with the area’s German-inspired facade. This complex sits on a prominent full city block in the heart of the neighborhood and is part of the revitalization of the area along the Jefferson Avenue corridor.

As Germantown continues to be recognized for its modern growth and historical roots, more people are sure to call the area home, ensuring its continued growth and development.

Designing a Sleek, Fun Office Space for Two Tech Companies

Happy employees make happy customers…but how do you make employees happy?

Our Design Group recently had the privilege of designing the workspace for two tech companies in Middle Tennessee, Rustici Software and Watershed, which are housed in a former warehouse. The founder of both companies, Mike Rustici, believes in creating workspaces that make employees want to come to work, so we made this our focus from the beginning.

During our planning phase, Mike and his team emphasized how important it is to have multiple common areas that would encourage people to come together and share ideas. They wanted the space to be vibrant and attractive, so we used bright colors, wood elements and open-air design to achieve that.

To balance interaction with privacy, we designed small offices with glass doors and windows that give employees the quiet space they need to work while keeping the open areas visible. Because employees often work in teams, these offices are grouped together based on their area of expertise, giving them ample opportunity to come together and collaborate.

To get a glimpse of this newly designed office space, take a look at these photos:

One of the brightly colored collaboration rooms.

This area is perfect for work or play with large wooden tables, a TV screen and ping-pong table.

The kitchen is large with ample seating, and glass garage doors open up to the patio.

Pictured to the right is just one of the eight conference rooms throughout, and the area to the left is available for one-on-one collaboration.

This covered deck is just the right spot to get a breath of fresh air while overlooking the Bocce Ball court.

With a variety of different workspaces to choose from, the teams at Rustici Software and Watershed are sure to experience no shortage of creativity and flexibility. Mike Rustici said it best, “If cool, well-designed space allows our great people to work more productively and be happier at work, it is definitely worth it.”