Designing a Sleek, Fun Office Space for Two Tech Companies

Happy employees make happy customers…but how do you make employees happy?

Our Design Group recently had the privilege of designing the workspace for two tech companies in Middle Tennessee, Rustici Software and Watershed, which are housed in a former warehouse. The founder of both companies, Mike Rustici, believes in creating workspaces that make employees want to come to work, so we made this our focus from the beginning.

During our planning phase, Mike and his team emphasized how important it is to have multiple common areas that would encourage people to come together and share ideas. They wanted the space to be vibrant and attractive, so we used bright colors, wood elements and open-air design to achieve that.

To balance interaction with privacy, we designed small offices with glass doors and windows that give employees the quiet space they need to work while keeping the open areas visible. Because employees often work in teams, these offices are grouped together based on their area of expertise, giving them ample opportunity to come together and collaborate.

To get a glimpse of this newly designed office space, take a look at these photos:

One of the brightly colored collaboration rooms.

This area is perfect for work or play with large wooden tables, a TV screen and ping-pong table.

The kitchen is large with ample seating, and glass garage doors open up to the patio.

Pictured to the right is just one of the eight conference rooms throughout, and the area to the left is available for one-on-one collaboration.

This covered deck is just the right spot to get a breath of fresh air while overlooking the Bocce Ball court.

With a variety of different workspaces to choose from, the teams at Rustici Software and Watershed are sure to experience no shortage of creativity and flexibility. Mike Rustici said it best, “If cool, well-designed space allows our great people to work more productively and be happier at work, it is definitely worth it.”

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Dimension at Mallory Park Phase II Finds First Tenant in Verus Healthcare

This press release was originally released on March 21, 2017.

Verus Healthcare Anchors Project

NASHVILLE, Tenn. March 21, 2017 – Southeast Venture announced today that Franklin-based Verus Healthcare has signed a lease to occupy 34,561 square feet of office space in the second phase of the project. The healthcare supply company is the first to lease space in the 63,236 square-foot project and plans to move into the space in August.

Mallory Park

“We are thrilled to have found a larger office space with a higher parking ratio that keeps us well-positioned within Brentwood/Cool Springs’ flourishing healthcare center. Our company’s growth necessitated that we move from our current space in Cool Springs in order to continue providing the same high level of care to our patients around the country,” said Rich Roberts, CEO of Verus Healthcare.

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Mallory Park

Dimension at Mallory Park was specifically designed to accommodate companies like Verus Healthcare who are looking for higher density office space.

“Verus Healthcare is a perfect fit for the office space in Mallory Park,” said Michael Finucane, principal at Southeast Venture. “The higher parking ratios present a different opportunity than what’s traditionally been available in the Brentwood/Cool Springs office market. For a company experiencing growth like Verus, this space easily allows them to put more people into less space.”

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Dimension at Mallory Park Phase I was leased in full to Quorum Healthcare Corporation and completed last fall.

About Southeast Venture:

Founded in 1981, Southeast Venture is a diversified commercial real estate and design services company guided by a mission of “Building Value by Valuing Relationships.” The firm provides and coordinates the delivery of brokerage, development, architectural and interior design and property management. This unique, comprehensive approach to commercial real estate offers a cost effective and efficient way of meeting its clients’ commercial real estate needs. For more information, visit SoutheastVenture.com, or find Southeast Venture on Twitter @SEVentureCRE.

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Southeast Venture Announces Large-Scale Mural at Silo Bend

This press release was originally released on March 23, 2017.

Australian artist to paint lifelike mural on 200-foot tall Silo

NASHVILLE, Tenn., March 23, 2017 – Today Southeast Venture, in conjunction with Councilwoman Mary Carolyn Roberts and Art Consultant Brian Greif, announced plans for a large-scale mural to be painted on the 200-foot-tall abandoned silo at the new mixed-use development, Silo Bend.

Australian artist Guido van Helten has been contracted to paint the mural. Van Helten is known for his large-scale, site-specific murals that feature monochromatic portraits and local elements.

Guido van Helten – Fort Smith, AR

“This mural will be one of Silo Bend’s defining features,” said Mary Carolyn Roberts, councilwoman for District 20. “The enormous painting will be seen from almost a mile away and will be representative of The Nations community. We’re very excited to work with Guido and look forward to seeing his mural unveiled.”

Van Helten’s work can be found across the globe, from Australia to the United Kingdom and from Iceland to Mexico. Before beginning his work, Van Helten invests time and effort in developing the concept for a location by visiting the site and learning about the area’s culture, traditions and people.

Guido van Helten – Brim Silos in Australia

“Van Helten is especially talented at capturing the emotions of his subjects,” said Brian Greif, art consultant and owner of 2:32 AM Projects. “He primarily uses a monochromatic color scheme and features images of local subjects to highlight the culture of the area. We’re thrilled to bring his work to Nashville and to The Nations community.”

Van Helten is scheduled to visit Nashville on May 8 when he will spend four to five days meeting with residents of The Nations, learning about the neighborhood and developing his concept. Once he begins, it will take approximately six days to complete the mural.

Guido van Helten – State of Mexico

To learn more about Van Helten and see his portfolio, visit http://www.widewalls.ch/artist/guido-van-helten/.

About Southeast Venture:

Founded in 1981, Southeast Venture is a diversified commercial real estate and design services company guided by a mission of “Building Value by Valuing Relationships.” The firm provides and coordinates the delivery of brokerage, development, architectural and interior design and property management. This unique, comprehensive approach to commercial real estate offers a cost effective and efficient way of meeting its clients’ commercial real estate needs. For more information, visit SoutheastVenture.com, or find Southeast Venture on Twitter @SEVentureCRE.

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Southeast Venture Breaks Ground on The Flats @ Silo Bend

This press release was originally released on March 23, 2017.

Councilwoman Mary Carolyn Roberts, Art Consultant Brian Greif and Other Dignitaries Participate in Groundbreaking Ceremony

NASHVILLE, Tenn., March 23, 2017 – Today, local and community officials joined together with Southeast Venture and their honored guests to officially break ground on The Flats @ Silo Bend, a mixed-use development within The Nations.

The Flats @ Silo Bend is the development’s flagship structure, a 193-unit apartment building. Also planned for the development’s 37.7-acre site are single-family homes, office space, retail buildings and other apartments.

Pictured from left to right: Eric McKinney, Bill DeCamp, Mary Carolyn Roberts, Tarek El Gammal, Ginny Caldwell, Iain Shriver

“This is an exciting milestone for The Nations community,” said Mary Carolyn Roberts, councilwoman for District 20. “After many months of preparation, we are excited to officially break ground on this development. We know the mixed-use space will be beneficial both for our neighborhood and the surrounding areas.”

Pictured from left to right: Art Consultant Brian Greif, Councilwoman Mary Carolyn Roberts, Southeast Venture Principal Cam Sorenson

Silo Bend is located at the intersection of Centennial Boulevard and New York Avenue and touches the southern bank of the Cumberland River. The development is named for the 200-foot-tall abandoned concrete grain silo that sits on the property and its location across from a bend of the Cumberland River.

“We’re looking forward to seeing this area transformed into a vibrant, appealing place to live, dine and shop,” said Wood Caldwell, principal at Southeast Venture. “With a prime location in West Nashville, we’re hoping to attract both Nashville natives and newcomers to the development’s variety of spaces.”

Rendering of The Flats @ Silo Bend

Also unveiled at the groundbreaking were plans to paint a large-scale, site-specific mural on the property’s 200-foot-tall abandoned silo. Art Consultant Brian Greif announced Australian artist Guido van Helten was selected for the project. Van Helten plans to visit Nashville in May to meet with residents, learn about The Nations and develop the concept for the mural.

Video footage shot with drones by Brian Siskind was featured before the ceremony and gave attendees an aerial view of the property. When it is completed, Silo Bend will offer 3,500 square feet of ground floor retail space and surface-level parking.

About Southeast Venture:

Founded in 1981, Southeast Venture is a diversified commercial real estate and design services company guided by a mission of “Building Value by Valuing Relationships.” The firm provides and coordinates the delivery of brokerage, development, architectural and interior design and property management. This unique, comprehensive approach to commercial real estate offers a cost effective and efficient way of meeting its clients’ commercial real estate needs. For more information, visit SoutheastVenture.com, or find Southeast Venture on Twitter @SEVentureCRE.

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Is a Collaborative Workspace Right for Your Company?

One of the most popular interior design trends we’re seeing in commercial real estate is a collaborative workspace. Many of our clients come to us requesting this type of layout for their office. Despite its popularity, it’s not always the best design solution for a business.

To determine if a collaborative workspace is right for your company, let’s look at some of the primary design features.

Open Spaces

A collaborative workspace is designed to be open, spacious and inviting. It’s built on the idea of drawing people together to share new ideas and work with each other. Collaborative workspaces have common areas—sometimes more than one—that are easy to access and welcome both casual and business-focused conversations. These areas are often the center of the design, with small, individual offices on the perimeter, which often have glass walls and doors. These offices give employees quiet space when they need to work alone, while also allowing them to see the common areas and not miss out on what’s happening outside their offices.

Rustici / Watershed

From small nooks to large conference rooms, the Rustici Software / Watershed offices have multiple spaces for employees to choose from.

The layout of a space can either hinder or encourage collaboration, so it’s important to design spaces that are conducive to this activity based on your company’s needs. If your work requires you to gather around a computer screen with others, consider having an area with high-top tables and a large screen that everyone can easily see. Or if you need to draw concepts out, include dry erase boards in different areas throughout the office.

Options to Move Around

One of the main advantages of a collaborative workspace is flexibility—having the option to work in different locations throughout the office, both individually and with groups of people. Thanks to the move from stationary PC’s to laptops and tablets, it’s easy for employees to work in many different places, including in their offices, a conference room or a Bistro Cafe. This especially appeals to millennials because this generation prefers a collaborative work culture. Having options to move around helps their creativity and energizes them more than working in a single space all day long.

MediCopy

The breakroom at MediCopy offers a variety of seating options and plenty of sunlight.

Another effective aspect of a collaborative workspace design is having more than one path of travel through the office. Collaboration can happen unintentionally when someone passes by a fellow team member and starts a conversation. Designing multiple routes through the office increases the chances of this happening.

But is a collaborative workspace right for YOUR company?

Because collaboration has become a bit of a buzzword, some companies are quick to assume that this type of office design is what their business needs. But, that’s not always the case. It is vitally important to consider the day-to-day reality of your company and whether or not collaboration is needed or even beneficial.

Some professionals, such as accountants or attorneys, need quiet space to focus on their work. Introducing a collaborative design would likely disrupt their working habits and make it more difficult to focus on tasks.

Alternatives

Fortunately, there are alternatives to a collaborative workspace for companies that are looking for a new office design.

Many companies are deciding to lower their cubicle panels and bring workstations around the perimeter to allow for more daylight. They’re also making individual offices a smaller, standard size—rather than determining the size based on job title—and incorporating more glass walls and doors to encourage transparency and employee engagement.

With low panels, the cubicles at Concept Technology Inc. make the room feel open while giving employees a designated space to work.

When a company asks us to design a collaborative workspace for their employees, we first take time to learn about the daily routines in the office to determine how their space can better accommodate their needs. Companies recognize that rent isn’t cheap, so we strive to help them maximize space in the best ways possible. A well-designed space is proven to improve productivity, organizational performance and employee satisfaction. Determining how to achieve this through design is what we do best.

Southeast Venture: A Legacy 35 Years in the Making

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Starting back row (l-r): Axson West, Greg Coleman, John Cavin, Kerry Osborne, Michael Finucane; Todd Alexander, Jon Petty, Iain Shriver, Morgan Brown, Aaron White; Roscoe High, Treanor Granberry, Cam Sorenson, Curt Schriner, Beau Brady, Nathan Narwold, Wood Caldwell, Gaius Overton, Paul Plummer; JC Darby, Jimmy Pickel, Coleman Boyd, Celeste Mize, Megan Johnson, Sims Polk, Brett Downey, Samantha O’Leary; Randy Parham, Laura Ristvedt, Kim Ingram, Adam Upton, Kelly Sullivan, Michael Wrigley, Kaylen Harrison; Lee White, Tarek El Gammal, Ginny Caldwell, Monnika Whittenberg, Katie Gray, Kevin Liegibel; Not Pictured: Willie Moody, Jeremy Coward

Today we look back at how the city has changed since we opened our doors 35 years ago.

In 1981, Nashville was a fraction of the city it is today. Richard Fulton was mayor and Kim Carnes’ Bette Davis Eyes was the most popular song on the radio. Only two minor league pro sports teams resided here: the Nashville Sounds baseball team and the South Stars hockey team. That same year, singer/songwriter Vernon Dalhart and Grand Ole Opry announcer Grant Turner were inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. A mere 448,003 people called Nashville home – compared to the 659,042 estimated  in 2016. And that is just in Davidson County – the Metropolitan Statistic Area rose from 1.59 million to 1.75 million during the same period.

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Design Group: Paul Plummer, Iain Shriver, Kerry Osborne; Curt Schriner, Beau Brady, Nathan Narwold, Morgan Brown, Gaius Overton; Celeste Mize, Sims Polk, Brett Downey, Samantha O’Leary; Monnika Whittenberg, Katie Gray, Ginny Caldwell, Kevin Liegibel

Music City’s growth has brought significant changes to the Nashville skyline. In 1981, there were only nine buildings downtown higher than 10 stories – that is, the skyline consisted of a few tall buildings rising above the 4- to 6-story buildings that predominated. Today, the skyline is dominated by high-rises of 15-30 stories–24 and counting! In 1981, the William R. Snodgrass Tennessee Tower (then known as the American General Building) held the title of tallest building at 452 feet. Today, that structure is overshadowed by the 617 foot tall AT&T Building, more commonly known as the Batman Building. And the rents of commercial office space have also risen, from $17 per square foot in 1981 to more than $40 per square foot today.

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Brokerage: John Cavin, Greg Coleman, Michael Finucane, Axson West; Roscoe High, Jimmy Pickel, Coleman Boyd, Todd Alexander, Jon Petty, Kaylen Harrison; Treanor Granberry, Tarek El Gammal, Randy Parham, Lee White, Kelly Sullivan, Wood Caldwell, JC Darby; Not Pictured: Jeremy Coward

Other than the physical changes downtown, the most significant change is the influx of downtown residents.  The number has skyrocketed from virtually none to more than 14,000 people. This much higher concentration of downtown residents has led to a resurgence of downtown retail; something Nashville has not enjoyed since the 1960s.

Downtown Nashville also sees much more foot traffic than it did 35 years ago. Back in the day, people rarely ventured downtown. Lower Broadway was mostly shuttered storefronts and strip clubs. Today, more than 13.5 million tourists visit Nashville each year—making it one of the top 50 places in the world to visit, according to Travel + Leisure. Thanks to the growing tourism industry, hotel availability has more than doubled in the last 35 years.  In 1981, just 12,200 rooms were available. Today, more than 27,100 are available, with nearly 2,000 under construction.

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Accounting & Property Management: Randy Parham, Laura Ristvedt, Aaron White, Megan Johnson, Adam Upton, Michael Wrigley, Kim Ingram, not pictured: Willie Moody

We, Southeast Venture, have made a tremendous impact on Nashville over the years by staying true to our mission: Building Value by Valuing Relationships. This is more than just a mission statement, it’s a mindset that has shaped the direction of our company from day one. With it we have fostered partnerships with many great companies throughout Middle Tennessee, resulting in some of our city’s most prominent architecture. From our first construction project on the Perimeter Park Executive Center to our newest multi-use apartment and retail development Eastside Heights, Southeast Venture will continue to shape Nashville real estate for years to come.

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Principals (l-r): Randy Parham, Michael Finucane, Wood Caldwell, Paul Plummer, Cam Sorenson, Axson West, Todd Alexander, Tarek El Gammal

Hotel Developer Purchases 9.12-Acre Property Near Nashville International Airport

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This press release was originally released on Jan. 13, 2017. 

Hotel Developer Purchases 9.12-Acre Property Near Nashville International Airport

NASHVILLE, Tenn., Jan. 13, 2017 — North Dakota-based hotel developer Dakota Legacy Group has purchased 9.12-acres at 16 Century City Blvd – near the Nashville International Airport – for $1.995 million. The property is one of the last remaining parcels of raw land in the Century City complex.

The buyer, Dakota Legacy Group, was self-represented in the deal. Southeast Venture Brokers James Roscoe High, CCIM and J.C. Darby represented the seller, 16 Century City Blvd., an entity of Nashville-based boutique real estate company Anchor Investments.

“We are excited to close out another successful project for our investors and look forward to seeing Dakota bring their project to life,“ said Micah Lacher, president of Anchor Investments. “We appreciate all that Roscoe and JC have done to help us complete another great project for our team.”

Dakota Legacy Group plans to develop a hotel on the property.

“Nashville International Airport recently reported record-breaking numbers in terms of passenger traffic for the fourth year in a row, and they welcomed several new airlines, routes and services,” said High. “That said, there’s high demand in this area for more affordable hotels, and we are pleased to partner with Dakota Legacy Group to provide that.”

High and Darby represented Anchor Investments in 2015 in the purchase of the property from Duke Realty for $1.25 million. The company had interest from several hotel developers prior to selling the property to Dakota Legacy Group.

About Anchor Investments

Anchor Investments is a private, Nashville-based real estate investment company that was formed to acquire, own, develop and manage income-producing commercial properties in the Southeast. Anchor is an active operator and investor that targets value-added commercial properties. The partners’ philosophy is to use their years of combined asset management, development and leasing expertise to maximize the performance of each investment.

About Southeast Venture

Founded in 1981, Southeast Venture is a diversified commercial real estate and design services company guided by a mission of “Building Value by Valuing Relationships.” The firm provides and coordinates the delivery of brokerage, development, architectural and interior design and property management. This unique, comprehensive approach to commercial real estate offers a cost effective and efficient way of meeting its clients’ commercial real estate needs. For more information, visit SoutheastVenture.com, or find Southeast Venture on Twitter @SEVentureCRE.

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Photo credit: Derrick Brutel