Tag Archives: development

Southeast Venture Announces Large-Scale Mural at Silo Bend

This press release was originally released on March 23, 2017.

Australian artist to paint lifelike mural on 200-foot tall Silo

NASHVILLE, Tenn., March 23, 2017 – Today Southeast Venture, in conjunction with Councilwoman Mary Carolyn Roberts and Art Consultant Brian Greif, announced plans for a large-scale mural to be painted on the 200-foot-tall abandoned silo at the new mixed-use development, Silo Bend.

Australian artist Guido van Helten has been contracted to paint the mural. Van Helten is known for his large-scale, site-specific murals that feature monochromatic portraits and local elements.

Guido van Helten – Fort Smith, AR

“This mural will be one of Silo Bend’s defining features,” said Mary Carolyn Roberts, councilwoman for District 20. “The enormous painting will be seen from almost a mile away and will be representative of The Nations community. We’re very excited to work with Guido and look forward to seeing his mural unveiled.”

Van Helten’s work can be found across the globe, from Australia to the United Kingdom and from Iceland to Mexico. Before beginning his work, Van Helten invests time and effort in developing the concept for a location by visiting the site and learning about the area’s culture, traditions and people.

Guido van Helten – Brim Silos in Australia

“Van Helten is especially talented at capturing the emotions of his subjects,” said Brian Greif, art consultant and owner of 2:32 AM Projects. “He primarily uses a monochromatic color scheme and features images of local subjects to highlight the culture of the area. We’re thrilled to bring his work to Nashville and to The Nations community.”

Van Helten is scheduled to visit Nashville on May 8 when he will spend four to five days meeting with residents of The Nations, learning about the neighborhood and developing his concept. Once he begins, it will take approximately six days to complete the mural.

Guido van Helten – State of Mexico

To learn more about Van Helten and see his portfolio, visit http://www.widewalls.ch/artist/guido-van-helten/.

About Southeast Venture:

Founded in 1981, Southeast Venture is a diversified commercial real estate and design services company guided by a mission of “Building Value by Valuing Relationships.” The firm provides and coordinates the delivery of brokerage, development, architectural and interior design and property management. This unique, comprehensive approach to commercial real estate offers a cost effective and efficient way of meeting its clients’ commercial real estate needs. For more information, visit SoutheastVenture.com, or find Southeast Venture on Twitter @SEVentureCRE.

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Southeast Venture Breaks Ground on The Flats @ Silo Bend

This press release was originally released on March 23, 2017.

Councilwoman Mary Carolyn Roberts, Art Consultant Brian Greif and Other Dignitaries Participate in Groundbreaking Ceremony

NASHVILLE, Tenn., March 23, 2017 – Today, local and community officials joined together with Southeast Venture and their honored guests to officially break ground on The Flats @ Silo Bend, a mixed-use development within The Nations.

The Flats @ Silo Bend is the development’s flagship structure, a 193-unit apartment building. Also planned for the development’s 37.7-acre site are single-family homes, office space, retail buildings and other apartments.

Pictured from left to right: Eric McKinney, Bill DeCamp, Mary Carolyn Roberts, Tarek El Gammal, Ginny Caldwell, Iain Shriver

“This is an exciting milestone for The Nations community,” said Mary Carolyn Roberts, councilwoman for District 20. “After many months of preparation, we are excited to officially break ground on this development. We know the mixed-use space will be beneficial both for our neighborhood and the surrounding areas.”

Pictured from left to right: Art Consultant Brian Greif, Councilwoman Mary Carolyn Roberts, Southeast Venture Principal Cam Sorenson

Silo Bend is located at the intersection of Centennial Boulevard and New York Avenue and touches the southern bank of the Cumberland River. The development is named for the 200-foot-tall abandoned concrete grain silo that sits on the property and its location across from a bend of the Cumberland River.

“We’re looking forward to seeing this area transformed into a vibrant, appealing place to live, dine and shop,” said Wood Caldwell, principal at Southeast Venture. “With a prime location in West Nashville, we’re hoping to attract both Nashville natives and newcomers to the development’s variety of spaces.”

Rendering of The Flats @ Silo Bend

Also unveiled at the groundbreaking were plans to paint a large-scale, site-specific mural on the property’s 200-foot-tall abandoned silo. Art Consultant Brian Greif announced Australian artist Guido van Helten was selected for the project. Van Helten plans to visit Nashville in May to meet with residents, learn about The Nations and develop the concept for the mural.

Video footage shot with drones by Brian Siskind was featured before the ceremony and gave attendees an aerial view of the property. When it is completed, Silo Bend will offer 3,500 square feet of ground floor retail space and surface-level parking.

About Southeast Venture:

Founded in 1981, Southeast Venture is a diversified commercial real estate and design services company guided by a mission of “Building Value by Valuing Relationships.” The firm provides and coordinates the delivery of brokerage, development, architectural and interior design and property management. This unique, comprehensive approach to commercial real estate offers a cost effective and efficient way of meeting its clients’ commercial real estate needs. For more information, visit SoutheastVenture.com, or find Southeast Venture on Twitter @SEVentureCRE.

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Hotel Developer Purchases 9.12-Acre Property Near Nashville International Airport

SEV horizontal logo

This press release was originally released on Jan. 13, 2017. 

Hotel Developer Purchases 9.12-Acre Property Near Nashville International Airport

NASHVILLE, Tenn., Jan. 13, 2017 — North Dakota-based hotel developer Dakota Legacy Group has purchased 9.12-acres at 16 Century City Blvd – near the Nashville International Airport – for $1.995 million. The property is one of the last remaining parcels of raw land in the Century City complex.

The buyer, Dakota Legacy Group, was self-represented in the deal. Southeast Venture Brokers James Roscoe High, CCIM and J.C. Darby represented the seller, 16 Century City Blvd., an entity of Nashville-based boutique real estate company Anchor Investments.

“We are excited to close out another successful project for our investors and look forward to seeing Dakota bring their project to life,“ said Micah Lacher, president of Anchor Investments. “We appreciate all that Roscoe and JC have done to help us complete another great project for our team.”

Dakota Legacy Group plans to develop a hotel on the property.

“Nashville International Airport recently reported record-breaking numbers in terms of passenger traffic for the fourth year in a row, and they welcomed several new airlines, routes and services,” said High. “That said, there’s high demand in this area for more affordable hotels, and we are pleased to partner with Dakota Legacy Group to provide that.”

High and Darby represented Anchor Investments in 2015 in the purchase of the property from Duke Realty for $1.25 million. The company had interest from several hotel developers prior to selling the property to Dakota Legacy Group.

About Anchor Investments

Anchor Investments is a private, Nashville-based real estate investment company that was formed to acquire, own, develop and manage income-producing commercial properties in the Southeast. Anchor is an active operator and investor that targets value-added commercial properties. The partners’ philosophy is to use their years of combined asset management, development and leasing expertise to maximize the performance of each investment.

About Southeast Venture

Founded in 1981, Southeast Venture is a diversified commercial real estate and design services company guided by a mission of “Building Value by Valuing Relationships.” The firm provides and coordinates the delivery of brokerage, development, architectural and interior design and property management. This unique, comprehensive approach to commercial real estate offers a cost effective and efficient way of meeting its clients’ commercial real estate needs. For more information, visit SoutheastVenture.com, or find Southeast Venture on Twitter @SEVentureCRE.

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Photo credit: Derrick Brutel

Southeast Venture welcomes Harrison as marketing coordinator


This article originally appeared in the Nashville Post on Dec. 13, 2016.

kaylen-harrisonNashville-based commercial real estate and design firm Southeast Venture has added Kaylen Harrison as its first ever full-time marketing coordinator.

Harrison (pictured) will work with Southeast Venture’s brokerage, design, development and property management team to expand the company’s presence in Nashville community, according to a release.

A University of Kentucky graduate, Harrison has held previous roles as a digital media specialist, marketing administrator and independent website manager. She has experience in lead generation, social media campaigns and the design and development of marketing tools and campaigns.

“We are lucky to have found someone with the wealth of knowledge and experience that Kaylen has demonstrated,” Todd Alexander, principal at Southeast Venture, said in the release. “Our company has grown to a place where we need in-house marketing support, and we are confident that Kaylen is the right person to handle this feat.”

 

New Mixed-Used Development in the Nations Neighborhood Takes Its Name from Landmark on Site

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This press release was originally released on Oct. 20, 2016.

New Mixed-Used Development in the Nations Neighborhood Takes Its Name from Landmark on Site

New Name and Logo Introduced to Community During Light the Nations 615 Festival This Weekend
 Will Break Ground for First Building in Early 2017

NASHVILLE, Tenn., Oct. 20, 2016 – Southeast Venture, developers of a 37.7-acre mixed use real estate development on Centennial Boulevard in The Nation’s neighborhood, announced today the name of the project: Silo Bend.

“The first thing everyone notices about this property is the 200-foot-tall abandoned concrete grain silo in the middle of the site, which was used years ago by the Gillette Grain Company. It’s quite impressive. In fact, it is featured in a video series by artist Brian Siskind called ‘The Nations Life,’” said Southeast Venture Principal Wood Caldwell.

(To see the video series, search for ‘the nations life’ on YouTube or set your browser to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gp8ks048vDk. Video credit: Brian Siskind/Those Drones, LLC)

“The silo can be see from miles away – including from the upper floors of downtown buildings – and it is by far the tallest structure in The Nation’s neighborhood. The owner had planned to incorporate it into this development from the beginning, so it is natural that this landmark would be integral to the brand. In addition to using the word ‘silo’ in the name, the logomark is a line drawing of the silo,” Caldwell added. “The second word in the name refers to the fact that this development is across from a bend of the Cumberland River.”

The new name will be officially unveiled this Saturday at Light The Nations 615 festival, of which Silo Bend is a title sponsor. Running from 4 to 10 p.m., the event will take place on 51st Avenue between Georgia and Illinois avenues. It will feature local businesses, art, vendors, food trucks and live entertainment, including musical acts Kree Harrison, Moon and Forty-Two and Tommy Hans. To learn more, go to lightthenations615.com.

Centered at the intersection of Centennial Boulevard and New York Avenue, Silo Bend extends from Centennial to the southern bank of the Cumberland River. When complete, Silo Bend will include single-family homes, apartments and retail stores. The property is owned by R. Manuel Cenntennial.

Caldwell said he expects ground to be broken for the first building – a 193-unit apartment building – by the first quarter of 2017. Southeast Venture is architect for Silo Bend, Barge Cauthen & Associates is the civil engineer, Hodson Douglas is the landscape architect and RPM Transportation is providing the traffic analysis and transportation plan.

About Southeast Venture:

Founded in 1981, Southeast Venture is a diversified commercial real estate and design services company guided by a mission of “Building Value by Valuing Relationships.” The firm provides and coordinates the delivery of brokerage, development, architectural and interior design and property management. This unique, comprehensive approach to commercial real estate offers a cost effective and efficient way of meeting its clients’ commercial real estate needs. For more information, visit SoutheastVenture.com, or find Southeast Venture on Twitter @SEVentureCRE.

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Nashville’s Warner Parks deserve to be treasured

(This article originally appeared in the Tennessean on June 8, 2016)

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In a city that’s quickly becoming more urbanized, Nashville is privileged to have one of the nation’s largest city parks— Percy Warner Park. The combined 3,100 acres of Percy Warner and its smaller and equally beautiful counterpart, Edwin Warner Park, compose America’s 19th largest park within a municipality.

The Warner Parks are one of Nashville’s greatest gems, granting residents access to luscious forests, hiking and cycling trails, picnic areas, scenic overlooks and much more.

In true Nashville style, the Warner Parks have only gotten bigger and better with time. In 2014, H.G. Hill Realty Company generously sold 250 acres of pristine old-growth forest, well below appraisal price, to Friends of Warner Park. The nonprofit turned the property — now called Burch Reserve — over to Metro for free, so that it could be used as an addition to Edwin Warner Park. I commend H.G. Hill for their generosity and efforts to preserve this valuable, unspoiled natural land.

Located north of Highway 100 across from Edwin Warner Park, Burch Reserve will extend Edwin Warner across the highway, and will include an underground pedestrian tunnel beneath the CSX railroad tracks. This new section of the park will be open to the public this fall.

H.G. Hill, along with Friends of Warner Parks, worked diligently to save from development this uninhabited land, which is considered one of the largest old-growth forests in an urban area in our region. Thanks to them, we will now be able to enjoy Burch Reserve’s native Tennessee wildlife and vegetation, such as oak and hickory trees, walnut trees and tulip poplars, for decades to come.

A true asset to Nashville, the Warner Parks provide a wide variety of things to do and see outside our small-big city. Boasting eight miles of bike trails and more than 10 hiking trails of varying lengths and skill levels, the Parks are a perfect place for a scenic afternoon ride or a sunrise run with friends. Percy Warner is also home to two public golf courses — the 18-hole Harpeth Hills Golf Course and the 9-hole Percy Warner Golf Course.

For the history buffs, the Warner Parks are listed on the National Register of Historic Places and are home to several Nashville landmarks. The Cedar Glen Spring House, the Hodge House and the World War I Memorial all tell great stories of Nashville’s past. The Allée/Belle Meade Steps are said to be the “front door” to the parks and make for a memorable and scenic climb.

Each year, Percy Warner Park is home to the iconic Iroquois Steeplechase, the nation’s oldest continuously run steeplechasing event — celebrating its 75th anniversary this year — and America’s second largest steeplechase race by size of purse. The races are run on a course in Percy Warner Park that was constructed by the Works Progress Administration in the 1930s.

More than 25,000 Nashvillians and tourists attend the Iroquois Steeplechase each year. And it’s all for a great cause. The event has raised more than $10 million for the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt since 1981.

At the race or on the trails, the parks provide a place for the Nashville community to gather. Everyone is welcome to make use of this gift to our community — but, unfortunately, money doesn’t grow on trees. It is up to us, the residents of Nashville, to preserve this local treasure.

If you’ve ever enjoyed a hike, horse race, picnic or otherwise at Percy or Edwin Warner, I urge you to consider giving back through one of the parks’ many initiatives. Join beFRIEND Warner Parks, attend a Full Moon Pickin’ Party or volunteer your time at the Nature Center or on ParkWatch — your local parks and the Nashvillians of tomorrow will thank you.

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Wood Caldwell is managing principal of Southeast Venture, a diversified commercial real estate company. He writes about Middle Tennessee commercial real estate issues once a month for The Tennessean. Reach him at wcaldwell@southeastventure.com

Nashville’s ‘it’ status is 35 years in the making

By Wood Caldwell

(This article originally appeared in the Tennessean on March 21, 2016)

In 1981, Ronald Reagan was president, Music City (and the world) was introduced to MTV and our commercial real estate firm opened its doors. The view through our doors has certainly changed in the past 35 years.

The Nashville skyline has transformed dramatically. The American General Tower (now Tennessee Tower) was the city’s tallest building in 1981, because the AT&T headquarters — aka “The Bat Building” — had not arrived. Other skyline-defining buildings missing in 1981 included 5/3 Center, One Nashville Place, Nashville City Center, Pinnacle at Symphony Place, the Schermerhorn Symphony Center, Bridgestone Arena, Viridian Tower, Encore, the Renaissance Hotel, Downtown Hilton Hotel, Omni Nashville Hotel, the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, and the Music City Center, to name but a few. Today, our skyline is ranked as the 12th most beautiful in the nation by Thrilllist.

Nashville Skyline Crop

The ground-level view of downtown has changed just as significantly for the better. Pockmarked with shuttered storefronts, strip clubs and porn shops, Lower Broad was far from a tourist Mecca. In fact, the Nashville Convention Center was built in the mid-1980s with no windows or doors on the Broadway side of the building because the street was such an eyesore.

The only real foot traffic downtown was on Second Avenue (then known as Market Street), where some enterprising entrepreneurs had purchased the old warehouses there and begun to transform them into retail stores, restaurants and office space. But even this part of town was largely deserted after dark. People just didn’t go downtown, no matter how much you enticed them, which was proven when a beautiful shopping mall was built where the downtown public library sits today. It lasted about two years.

The idea that the industrial area south of Broadway, now known as SoBro, or the grimy and depressed area near the railroad switching yard, aka The Gulch, would someday be home to some of the most valuable real estate in town would have been outlandish, had anyone been crazy enough to suggest this.

Union Station Hotel was still an abandoned train station. The Frist Center for the Visual Arts was still a post office. Cummins Station was an abandoned warehouse. The city’s largest strip club, the Classic Cat, was next door to Hume Fogg High School. The Hall of Fame was in a rather small, barnlike building on Music Row. Where the Roundabout Building is today sat a portion of Hank Williams home, which someone had moved there as a tourist attraction (though I never saw it attract anyone). There was no Music Row Roundabout, no “Musica” statue — just a confusing intersection of five streets.

Looking outside of Downtown Nashville, there was no Cool Springs and The Mall at Green Hills was a modest, one-story affair. In contrast, Hickory Hollow Mall was the highest grossing mall in the state and its cousin north of town, Rivergate, was also minting money.

For a night on the town, Hillsboro Village was the only urban, mixed-use part of town, and it was becoming the trendy restaurant hub of Nashville, thanks to pioneering restaurateur Jody Faison, who launched Faison’s in the early 1980s and essentially founded Nashville’s independent restaurant landscape. Within a few years, Randy Rayburn opened Sunset Grill, and Hillsboro Village’s restaurant run began in earnest.

The striking difference between then and now is the result of enlightened city leaders and local real estate visionaries working together to build a better city. It has been a privilege to have a front-row seat to this incredible transformation.

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Wood S. Caldwell is managing principal of Southeast Venture, a diversified commercial real estate company. He writes about Middle Tennessee real estate deals once a month for The Tennessean. Reach him at wcaldwell@southeastventure.com.